5 Great Benefits of Drawing With Your Child Every Day
Reading Time: 5 minutes

Every child wants to draw. It’s natural because drawing is fun and they get to practice their imagination.

But what if they could do it every day? How much better would that be?

If you ask them, most kids will say “I don’t like drawing.”

But then they get older and begin to realize that there are benefits to drawing every day.

Below are five benefits children can get from drawing everyday.

Benefit #1: They can express themselves through drawing

Some children find it difficult to express their feelings and make sense of things that are too strong to express in words.

Drawing is an excellent way for children to express themselves through their art.

They can use different mediums such as colored pencils, markers, crayons, watercolors or paint. Using those, they can express their ideas and feelings about the world around them.

This can be particularly helpful for kids who may have trouble expressing themselves verbally.

For instance, if your child likes animals but has difficulty writing about them or even just saying what they want in words, then having a way of communicating with them through art is a good way of expressing their feelings without actually having to put them into words.

5 Great Benefits of Drawing With Your Child Every Day
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If your child is shy and finds it hard to express themselves verbally then this benefit alone can make drawing a positive experience for them in school instead of something that they dread doing because it makes them feel dumb or different from others around them who can talk well and talk more often than they do (like some kids do).

So let your child express themselves through art. Don’t take away the positive benefits of drawing by pushing it away because you don’t think it’s “cool” anymore.

By allowing your child to express themselves through art, you are helping them develop a strong foundation for the future. It also helps in increasing the likelihood that they will continue doing so throughout life.

By participating in creative activities, children will learn how to solve problems and come up with their own answers. They will also discover the cause of their actions, and they will feel confident in the choices they make.

Benefit #2: They learn how to follow directions

Drawing is an excellent way for children to learn how to follow directions when being taught how to draw something by someone else.

Children need someone who has experience with the subject matter being drawn. This way, they can understand what information needs to be put into the picture. For example, people draw trees when they are learning about trees themselves.

The ability to follow directions is something that children will need throughout their lives and drawing helps them learn how to do this.

Sometimes your child may ask you to be more involved in her creative activities.

Later on, you can follow your child’s lead and encourage his confidence by descriptively praising his creative activities.

Benefit #3: They learn how to look at a picture from different angles

A photograph can only show you one perspective on a subject (or in this case, the photo itself) which means that if you want to know more about it then you have to move around it (which can be difficult at times).

Drawing allows you to see different perspectives on the same subject because it has depth and space within it (similarly, a photograph doesn’t have depth or space).

When children are learning how to draw they need someone who can give them instructions on how they should be looking at the subject matter being drawn so that they can see all sides of it (for example trees draw children when they are learning how to draw trees and what kind of tree they should draw).

The ability to look at a subject from different angles is something that children will need throughout their lives and drawing helps them learn how to do this. If your child is a “self-starter” and can’t seem to get started on anything then drawing may be a good way for them to get started.

5 Great Benefits of Drawing With Your Child Every Day
Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Benefit #4: They learn about perspective

When you draw something you need to have an understanding of perspective because if you don’t know what it is then it will be difficult for you to draw the subject matter in the correct way.

For example, if you are drawing a stick figure and don’t know what the proper perspective should be then your stick figure will end up looking like a flat object.

Perspective can also help kids understand how their drawings are supposed to look by giving them an idea of what things should look like at different distances from the viewer (for example trees draw children when they are learning how to draw trees and what kind of tree they should draw).

The ability to draw a subject in perspective is something that children will need throughout their lives and drawing helps them learn how to do this.

Benefit #5: They can see how things are put together

If you ask children why they like doing something, most of the time they will say it’s because it’s fun. But sometimes it isn’t always fun and instead of just saying that they want to know why.

It is more likely that children will be interested in an activity. They will continue working at that activity when they choose it, rather than it being chosen for them by the teacher.

There are multiple opportunities each day for children to develop fine motor skills and finger dexterity by manipulating various manipulatives, including magnetic letters, pegboards, and writing implements.

Most children practice their fine motor skills by playing and by doing regular everyday activities.

With the help of art, kids can learn how to use fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination.

Drawing is an excellent way for children to understand how things are put together. They can also learn how to fix or make something.

The ability to see how things are put together is something that children will need throughout their lives. Drawing helps them learn how to do this.

As your child grows and learns more fine motor skills, he or she may move on to more advanced skills.

These complex skills, which require coordinated efforts between their fingers, hands, and eyes, begin with grasping a rattle and raking a finger as babies grow up.

From there, they will develop more complex skills. These can be using scissors, manipulating a computer mouse, and even playing a musical instrument.

If your child is a “self-starter” and can’t seem to get started on anything, try getting them to start drawing. It is also good practice for some of your child’s drawing skills.

Conclusion

If you don’t believe drawing is fun, think about all the things you’ve done in your life that weren’t fun.

Things like schoolwork, chores, playing a sport, or even having to go to bed early at night and get up early in the morning aren’t always fun. But you still did them because you wanted to learn something and make something better than you had before.

Drawing is an excellent way for children to learn how to do this (instead of doing nothing at all).

It can be as simple as drawing a stick figure on paper. It can also be as complex as drawing a full-sized portrait of a person. The point is that it should be fun and enjoyable for your child.

So if you want your child to enjoy doing something then encourage them to draw every day. Don’t discourage them if they say they don’t like it. They may be making progress towards becoming better at what they are doing.

For more parenting tips and advice, check out our blog, Mindful Parent!