How to make kids listen: Communication tips and tricks
Reading Time: 2 minutes

Every parent has had the experience of having their child ignore them. The child is busy playing, talking to friends, watching television, or doing exciting and fun activities.

The parent is trying to get the child’s attention, and the child does not respond or responds in a way that indicates that the child wishes the parent would just go away. This situation is a cause of great frustration for parents, but it is really quite predictable.

The child may seem to be ignoring the parent’s request and all the reasons that the parent has for wanting the child to respond. Still, the child’s lack of response or lack of attention is actually quite predictable.

The child is not ignoring the parent, but rather, the child ignores the parent. The child just doesn’t know how to respond.

The child has been taught not to respond to the parent, or the child is being rewarded for non-response. And so, the child has learned that when the parent is talking to the child, the child should not listen to the parent.

Here are some suggestions for how to make kids listen:

1. Don’t punish your child for not responding or not listening.

A child punished for not responding to a parent will learn that the child should not listen to the parent when the parent is talking to the child.

The child will learn that the parent’s attention is not very enjoyable. The child will learn that the parent’s attention is something to be avoided rather than enjoyed.

2. Make the parent’s attention rewarding.

Make the parent’s attention rewarding. The parent’s attention should be something the child wants and enjoys. The parent’s attention should be something that the child wants to pay attention to. The parent’s attention should not be something that the child wants to avoid.

3. Make the parent’s attention something that the child looks forward to.

If the child looks forward to the parent’s attention, then the child will want to listen to the parent. The child will want to pay attention to the parent.

4. Give the child a choice.

Give the child a choice between ignoring the parent and paying attention to the parent. If the child chooses to ignore the parent, the child has decided not to pay attention.

The child has decided that the parent’s attention is not something the child wants or likes. If the child chooses to pay attention to the parent, the child has decided to pay attention.

The child has decided that the parent’s attention is something the child wants or likes. The child has decided that the parent’s attention is something the child wants to pay attention to.

5. Don’t force the child to be with the parent.

If the parent forces the child to be with the parent, the child may feel compelled to avoid the parent’s attention. If the child is forced to pay attention to the parent, and the parent is not doing anything the child wants or likes, they will feel that they should avoid the parent’s attention. The child will not want to pay attention to the parent. The child will not want to listen to the parent.